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There is no such thing as an expert on the topic of Life. We all have had our battles, our suffering, and our questions. Despite the uniqueness of our personal obstacles, we have endured them. We have endured them well enough to advise those behind us as to how to do the same. I have done the research on your behalf regarding the multitude of reasons why wisdom exists. My mission is to utilize the voices of the world's greatest thinkers and heroes to compose a guideline of life's wisdom so that you don't have to experience those trials alone.

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Saturday, February 21, 2015

A moment for Stewardship



Pulled from the following website: 
http://www.drsfostersmith.com/pic/article.cfm?aid=1418

What, you ask, does building a snowman have in common with bird feeding? Well, not only is building a snowman a fun and festive way to welcome winter, but it can also be a creative, just-the-right-height way to deliver bird food. Build a snowman out of three balls of snow as usual, and then use birdseed and other bird foods to create the snowman's details.
Use corncobs or suet logs to create a smile. Give your snowman hair by dangling millet from its head. Or, sprinkle some black sunflower or thistle seeds onto its head. Dried sunflowers make ideal ear muffs. Make eyes and a nose out of suet balls or seed cakes.
Make tasty buttons out of seed ornaments. To complete your snowman, use branches to provide birds a place to perch. Favorites like these are sure to attract a variety of birds.
Many people decorate their outdoor trees for the holidays. We suggest you forgo the strings of lights and bundles of tinsel and, instead, use only bird-edible materials that birds can eat safely. Turn your backyard conifers into works of art. Make your own pinecone feeder ornaments, or simply cut suet cakes into 4 smaller squares, punch a hole through the middle, and string from the branches to make square ornaments.
You can also decorate a tree by draping millet sprigs from it, stringing garland made from dried fruit and popcorn, and much more. Be creative, and remember to keep birds' safety in mind by staying away from processed human foods that can be harmful to birds.
When the wind blows and the snow falls, gather your friends and family - especially your children - and use your creativity to design an edible snowman or decorate a tree. Not only will you be given an opportunity to spend time in nature, but you will ensure your wild birds are fed well during the long winter months.

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